Chapter One

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The Abrahamic Covenant Guaranteed The Blessings Of Physical Health And Material Prosperity For Old Testament Judaism. The Christian Religion Must Do The Same In The Christian Era; Otherwise, Old Testament Judaism Is The Superior Religion.

         The Abrahamic Covenant guaranteed the blessings of physical health and material prosperity for Old Testament Judaism. The Christian religion must do the same in the Christian era; otherwise, Old Testament Judaism is the superior religion. If the Christian religion doesn't provide and guarantee physical health and material prosperity in the New Testament era, equal to that provided and guaranteed by the Abrahamic Covenant during the Old Testament, then plainly Christianity is inferior to Old Testament Judaism. Few Christians, however, would concede that Christianity is inferior to Old Testament Judaism, or any other religion.

But, to escape the force of this assertion, those Christians not willing to concede the inferiority of Christianity to Old Testament Judaism must demonstrate one of two things. They must absolutely prove that the Abrahamic Covenant does not guarantee the blessings of physical health and material prosperity during the Old Testament era, and therefore the Christian religion does not have to guarantee them either. Or, if they are unable to demonstrate that the Abrahamic Covenant did not guarantee health and prosperity, then they must demonstrate an equal health and prosperity for Christianity; otherwise, Old Testament Judaism surpasses Christianity in the blessings and benefits it affords its people. This volume meets both these issues head on; physical health and material prosperity are indeed guaranteed in the Abrahamic Covenant. In addition, this volume demonstrates six other revelations:

1. The same Abrahamic Covenant that guaranteed health and wealth for Old Testament Judaism continues with unbroken force during the Christian era or Church age.

2. This same covenant that covered Abraham also included his seed. In this volume, we refer to Abraham's seed as the "Abrahamic Seed Group."

3. This volume demonstrates that the Abrahamic Seed Group includes Isaac, Jacob, Israel, and Christians of the Church age.

4. This volume locates the specific blessings of health and wealth enjoyed by Abraham and his Seed Group, attributed to The Abrahamic Covenant, giving book, chapter, and verse.

5. Beginning with Isaac, the first member of the Abrahamic Seed Group, this volume shows that he enjoyed the same blessings of health and wealth that Abraham enjoyed, and for the same reason: his inclusion in the Abrahamic Covenant as part of the Abrahamic Seed Group.

6. Then we repeat the process with Jacob, the second member of the Abrahamic Seed Group, showing that he also enjoyed the same blessings of health and wealth that both Abraham and Isaac enjoyed, and for the same reason: his inclusion within the borders of the Abrahamic Covenant. Next, we apply the book, chapter, and verse process to the Nation of Israel. And finally, we apply the process to Christians, who make up the present day "Membership Roster" of the Abrahamic Seed Group. Consequently, this volume demonstrates from Scripture that all of Abraham's seed, i.e., those who compose the "Membership Roster" of the Abrahamic Seed Group, from Isaac through the most insignificant Christian, are guaranteed the same blessings of health and wealth that Abraham himself enjoyed, and for the same reason: The Abrahamic Covenant.

We accomplish all the above by doing Five simple things that the reader can easily follow:

1. We list all Sixty Promises God gave to Abraham. (The Abrahamic Covenant is composed of sixty various promises.)

2. We isolate from the Sixty Promises those specific promises containing the terms "Bless," "Blessed," and "Blessing" for further consideration.

3. We fully define the terms "Bless," "Blessed," and "Blessing," using both Hebrew and Greek.

4. We then apply the complete definition of "Bless," "Blessed," and "Blessing" to the Sixty Promises of the Abrahamic Covenant in general.

5. Finally, we apply the complete definition of "Bless," "Blessed," and "Blessing" specifically to the lives of Abraham and his Seed Group (i.e., Isaac, Jacob, the Nation of Israel, and Christians) showing that health and wealth are part and parcel of the "Blessings" guaranteed by the Abrahamic Covenant.

The Sixty Promises God Made to Abraham, Which Collectively Form the Abrahamic Covenant

Moses recorded God's Sixty Promises to Abraham in Genesis 12:1-3; 13:14-17; 15:1-21; and 17:1-27. God sealed the promises with circumcision in Genesis 17:10, 11 and 23-27. He summarized the promises and guaranteed them with his oath in Genesis 22:16-18. He reconfirmed them to Isaac in Genesis 26:1-5 and to Jacob in Genesis 28:13-15 and 35:9-12. These Sixty Promises comprise, collectively in this work, what we refer to as either "The Promise," "The Promises," or "The Abrahamic Covenant." In Scripture, the singular "Promise" and the plural "Promises" are used interchangeably with no apparent difference of meaning. It may be they are viewed as an aggregate. Or, they could all be viewed as repeated at various intervals down through the centuries. At any rate, the singular "Promise" and the plural "Promises" are used interchangeably (See WEV III, p.219).

THE SIXTY PROMISES OF THE ABRAHAMIC COVENANT

Genesis 12:1-3

1. I will show thee a land (v.1)

2. I will make of thee a great nation (v.2).

3. I will bless thee (v.2).

4. I will make thy name great (v.2).

5. Thou shalt be a blessing (v.2).

6. I will bless them that bless thee (v.3).

7. I will curse them that curse thee (v.3).

8. In thee shall all families of the earth be blessed (or bless themselves) (v.3).

Genesis 13:15-17

9. All the land which thou seest, to thee will I give it...forever (v.15).

10. I will also give the land to thy seed forever (v.15).

11. I will make thy seed as the dust of the earth (v.16).

12. Walk through the land...for I will give it unto thee (v.17).

Genesis 15:1-21

13. I am thy shield (v.1).

14. I am thy exceedingly great reward (v.1).

15. He that shall come forth out of thine own loins shall be thine heir (v.4).

16. Abraham believed in the Lord and he counted it to him for righteousness (v.6).

17. Thy seed shall be as the stars of heaven (v.5).

18. I am the Lord who brought thee out of Ur of the Chaldees to give thee this land to inherit it (v.7).

19. Thy seed shall be in bondage (in Egypt) for 400 years (v.13).

20. That nation whom they shall serve (Egypt) will I judge (v.14).

21. Afterward, I will bring them out (of Egypt) with great substance (v.14).

22. Thou shalt go to thy fathers in peace (v.15).

23. Thou shalt be buried in a good old age (v.15).

24. In the fourth generation, they (thy seed) shall come here again (v.16).

25. Unto thy seed have I given this land (v.18).

26. In my covenant with you, I will set the River of Egypt and the great Euphrates River as the boundaries of the promised land (v.18).

Genesis 17:1-22

27. I will make my covenant between me and thee (Abraham) (v.2).

28. I will multiply thee exceedingly (v.2).

29. My covenant is with thee (v.4).

30. Thou shalt be a father of many nations (v.4).

31. Thy name shall be called Abraham rather than Abram (v.5).

32. I will make thee exceedingly fruitful (v.6).

33. I will make nations of thee (v.6).

34. Kings shall come out of thee (v.6).

35. The covenant between God, Abraham, and his seed in their generations coming after Abraham is an everlasting covenant (v.7).

36. I will be a God unto thee (v.7).

37. I will be a God unto thy seed after thee (v.7).

38. I will give all the land of Canaan to you and to your seed as an everlasting possession (v.8).

39. And I will be their (thy seed's) God (v.8).

40. Circumcision is the seal of the covenant for both Abraham and his male children (vv.9-14).

41. Sarai's name shall be changed to Sarah (v. 15).

42. I will bless Sarah (v.16).

43. I will give thee a son of Sarah (v.16).

44. I will bless her (v.16).

45. Sarah will be a mother of nations (v.16).

46. Kings of people shall be of Sarah (v.16).

47. Sarah's son shall be named Isaac (v 19).

48. I will establish my covenant with Isaac for an everlasting covenant (v.19).

49. I will establish my covenant with Isaac's seed after him for an everlasting covenant (v.19).

50. I have blessed Ishmael (v.20).

51. I will make Ishmael fruitful (v.20).

52. I will multiply Ishmael exceedingly (v.20).

53. Twelve princes shall Ishmael beget (v.20).

54. I will make Ishmael a great nation (v.20).

55. But, my covenant will I establish with Isaac (v.21).

Genesis 22:16-18

56. God guaranteed the covenant with his oath, saying, "By Myself have I sworn..." (v.16).

57. In blessing I will bless thee... (v.17).

58. In multiplying, I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven and as the sand which is upon the sea shore (v.17).

59. Thy seed shall possess the gate of his enemies (v.17).

60. In thy seed shall all families of the earth be blessed (v.18).

This list contains some overlapping. Consequently, it could be shortened. On the other hand, some of the sixty statements could be divided even more and the list could be lengthened. For our purposes though, this list of Sixty Promises suffices.

Those Specific Promises of the Sixty Which Contain the Terms "Bless," "Blessed," or "Blessing"

These terms are contained in Promises 3, 5, 6, 8, 42, 44, 50, 57, and 60. "Bless" in Promise 3 pertains to Abraham personally.  “Blessing” in Promise 5 is directed to unspecified others through the person of Abraham. "Bless" in Promise 6 relates to others who bless Abraham. "Blessed" in Promise 8 pertains to all the families of the earth through the person of Abraham. Of these four Promises (3, 5, 6, and 8), only Promise 3 relates to Abraham personally. Promises 5, 6, and 8 are all directed to others through the person of Abraham.

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"Bless" in Promises 42 and 44 relates to Sarah, while "blessed" in Promise 50 pertains to Ishmael. "Blessing" and "bless" in Promise 57 cover Abraham personally, but "bless" in Promise 60 covers all families of the earth through Abraham's seed.

The following visual analysis will be helpful in seeing at a glance to whom the terms "bless," "blessed," and "blessing" pertain in the Abrahamic Covenant:

I

1. Abraham personally Promise 3

2. Reaffirmed to Abraham with an oath Promise 57

II

3. Others unspecified Promise 5

4. Others specified Promise 6

III

5. Sarah personally Promise 42 and 44

6. Ishmael personally Promise 50

IV

7. All families of the earth Promise 8

8. Reaffirmed to all families of the earth with an oath Promise 60

What Does "Bless," "Blessed," and "Blessing" Mean?

        These terms translate into English different forms of the same Hebrew word BARAK. The BARAK root is translated "bless" 214 times, "blessed" 61 times, and "blessing" 67 times in the Hebrew statement. John W. Oswalt says the major function of BARAK "seems to have been to confer abundant and effective life upon something (Genesis 2:3; 1 Samuel 9:13; Isaiah 66:3) or someone” (Genesis 27:27 ff; Genesis 49) (TWOT,I, p.132). He further states "To bless in the Old Testament means "to endue with power for success, prosperity, fecundity, longevity, etc.'" (TWOT,I, p. 132). "Fecundity" means fruitful in childbearing. Consequently, Oswalt says, "In the patriarchal narratives, blessing is linked specifically to reproductive powers. The lesson is clear. God gives life" (TWOT,I, p.132)

In the Old Testament, BARAK is used in those contexts which present God alone as the source of blessing. "Whatever may have been the ancient, near eastern conception of the source of blessing the OT sees God as the only source"  (TWOT,I, p.132).  Therefore, “It is clear that for the OT the abundant life rests directly upon the loving and faithful nature of God" (TWOT,I, p.132).

From Dr. Oswalt's article cited above, the following emerge:

1. God is the source of blessing in the Old Testament.

2. As the source of blessing, God himself endues with power in the following seven areas of blessings:

SEVEN AREAS OF BLESSING

1. God endues with power for an abundant life.

2. He endues with power for an effective life.

3. Since life can be neither effective not abundant apart from the right relationship with God, we may say that God also endues with power for the salvation of the soul. (See Promise 16.)

4. He endues with power for success.

5. He endues with power for prosperity.

6. He endues with power for fecundity.

7. He endues with power for longevity.

In addition, the Greek Old Testament, the Septuagint (designated by the symbol LXX) translates the Hebrew word BARAK with the Greek word EULOGIA. This word combines EU, which means "well" with LOGOS, which means "speech." EULOGIA, then means "well-spoken" and in its various is translated into English by "bless," "blessed," or "blessing." In the LXX, EULOGIA is the usual translation of the BARAK group.

Dr. H. G. Link, writing about the meaning of EULOGIA as the translation of BARAK, says, "basically BARAK means endue with beneficial power. This meaning involves both the process of enduing and the condition of being endued. Hence, blessing originally involved a self-contained beneficial force which one could transmit to another..." (NID,I, p.207). Dr. Link equates "blessing" (both BARAK and EULOGIA) with "well-being." He says, "The nature of the blessing is that of conferring and transference of beneficial power, which produces fertility in men and in livestock and lands.  Blessing works vertically in the continued growth of succeeding generations. Horizontally, it effects peace, security from enemies, good fortune and well-being for a tribe or group (expressed most comprehensively in the concept 'salom', well-being)" (NID,I, p.208). He summarizes by saying that blessing "portrays the earthly well-being of the people and the land" (NID,I, p.208).

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Concerning the use of BARAK and EULOGIA in the Abrahamic Covenant, Dr. Link states that, "It is a striking feature of the formulation of the promise that in these programmatic promises, the root BARAK occurs five times, each time in a different form, as the key word..." (NID, I, p.209). But, "blessing" is the key word in the Abrahamic Covenant, not only for the history of Israel but also all families of the earth. For this reason, "Genesis 12:3b sets before 'all tribes of the earth' a history of blessing. It includes liberation from vain toil (Genesis 3:17), carefraught wandering (Genesis 4:11ff.), base servitude (Genesis 9:25) and the destructive chaos of the nations (Genesis 11:1ff.). Thus in Genesis 12:1-3, the Yahwist spans the histories of patriarchs, nation, and mankind with his promise of blessing" (NID,I, p.209).

The "blessing" that spans the histories of patriarchs, nation, and mankind includes within its borders the twentythree concepts gleaned from the article of Dr. Link cited above. A concise list follows:

1. Conferring and transference of beneficial power.

2. Fertility in men, livestock, and land.

3. Continued growth of succeeding generations.

4. Peace.

5. Security from enemies.

6. Good fortune.

7. Well-being.

8. Posterity.

9. Liberation from vain toil.

10. Liberation from carefraught wandering.

11. Liberation from base servitude.

12. Destructive choas of the nations.

         In addition, Dr. H. G. Link includes Within the borders of “blessing: these additional concepts:

13. Unconditional.

14. Irrevocable.

15. Permanent.

16. Political unity.

17. Harmony with neighbors.

18. Victory over enemies.

19. Abundance in the kneading trough.

20. Protection.

21. Grace.

22. Quiet life.

23. Prosperity.

From the above discussion of BARAK-EULOGIA, three great facts emerge:

1. "Blessing" comes only from God.

2. "Blessing" requires an enduement of God's beneficial power.

3. Included within the scope of God's beneficial power is "well-being" for every area of life, that is, salvation for the soul, material wealth, (at the very least, having our needs met), and physical health, etc. From these three great facts, we derive the following concise definition of BARAK-EULOGIA: "God's beneficial enduement of power to produce well-being in every area of life." (Although neither Link nor Oswald mentioned healing specifically, we will demonstrate shortly that BARAK-EULOGIA does in fact include it.)

A word must be said about God as the source of "blessing." From Genesis through the Revelation, the God of Scripture specifically singled out from the rest of humanity only one group of people, Abraham and his seed, to whom he specifically committed himself in the form of Sixty Promises. Because of this commitment, God embraced Abraham and his seed in a way in which he embraced no other group of people in recorded history. These Sixty Promises, made exclusively to this one group of people, contain his commitment to bless them to the full extent allotted within the meaning of BARAK-EULOGIA. Since both the Sixty Promises and BARAK-EULOGIA Encompass within their borders the concept of "God's enduement of beneficial power to produce well-being in every area of life," it follows that God intends for nothing beneficial to be withheld from this particular group.

Now, the God of Scripture himself made this commitment to withhold nothing beneficial from this one group, i.e., Abraham and his seed. No other god ever made such a commitment to them. In addition, the God of Scripture neither directed these Sixty Promises, nor made a similar commitment to any other group of people. In other words, the God of Scripture (and no other god) made an exclusive commitment in the form of Sixty Promises to one group only, Abraham and his seed, and to no others in recorded history.

Therefore, wherever Scripture records something beneficial from this one God of Scripture and directed to this one group, we are not only justified but we are also logically compelled to do two things. We are forced to attribute the origin and the existence of that beneficial something to the Abrahamic Covenant. To put it another way, God's blessings to this exclusive group, wherever we find these blessings recorded in Scripture, owe both their origin and their existence to the Abrahamic Covenant. This is so whether the term "blessing" is used or not. Dr. Link said, "It is, therefore, necessary for the understanding of the OT concept of blessing to deal not only with cases of the BARAK and EULOGIA groups of words but also with texts which describe the blessings in their own way without using this terminology" (NID,I, p.207). To be more precise, in Scripture, whether the Old or New Testament, any "blessing" that passes from their one Covenant God of Scripture to this one group covered by the Sixty Promises (Abraham and his seed), that "blessing" owes both its origin and existence to the Abrahamic Covenant, whether the term "blessing" is used or not.

In addition, this one God made this exclusive commitment to one group and placed this commitment within a time frame. He declared that this Sixty Promises-(BARAK-EULOGIA)-Covenant Structure would continue forever. Promise 35 states, "The covenant between God, Abraham, and his seed in their generation coming after Abraham is an everlasting covenant." Promise 49 declares, "I will establish my covenant with Isaac's seed after him for an everlasting covenant." Consequently, until one can prove that God canceled, set aside, subsumed, or voided his "forever," then we must conclude two things: (1) Any blessing that passes from the God of Scripture to the one Abrahamic Seed Group owes both its origin and its existence to the Sixty Promises-(BARAK-EULOGIA)-Covenant Structure, and, (2) This is so—no matter where in Scripture we find the blessing recorded.  It is just as true when blessing is recorded in the New Testament for two simple reasons:

Reason 1. The term "forever" encompasses the New Testament era as well as the Old Testament era.

Reason 2. The Abrahamic Seed Group is still in existence in the New Testament era (more on this later).

Since the covenant and the Abrahamic Seed Group both last "forever," we must look for these crucial concepts throughout the Scriptures. This volume will demonstrate their great importance. We will see that no theological system can be relied upon which fails to give these two concepts their proper place.

The General Application of BARAK- EULOGIA to the Sixty Promises

In general, the Sixty Promises God made Abraham fit like a glove within the preceding definition of BARAK-EULOGIA. Every-thing God promised him and his seed Group lies within the borders of BARAK-EULOGIA. Every Promise he made them carries with it his enduement of beneficial power to produce well-being in that specific area of their lives.

Broadly speaking, both the Sixty Promises and BARAK-EULOGIA cover Three basic areas of life.  First, God’s beneficial power produced well-being in the area of salvation for the soul. (See Promise 16.) "Abraham believed in the Lord and he counted it to him for righteousness." Second, his beneficial power produced well-being in the area of material wealth. Look at the Promises concerning the land; (1, 9, 10, 12, 18, 24, 25, 26, and 38). Finally, his beneficial power produced well-being in the area of physical health. The Scripture contains no record of Abraham's being ill, since God promised him a "good old age," not a "sickly' old age, mind you, but a "good old age." In addition, his healthy condition enabled him to bear children past the time of childbearing. (See Promises 2, 30, 32, 33, and 45.)

The Application of BARAK-EULOGIA to the Case of Abraham

The preceding discussion applies the definition of BARAK-EULOGIA to the Abrahamic Covenant. Now, consider Abraham specifically. Genesis 24:1 and 35 describe God's blessings to him as consisting of great wealth. "And Abraham was old and well in age: and the Lord blessed him in all things...the Lord hath blessed my master (Abraham) greatly: and he is become great: and he hath given him flocks, and herds, and silver, and gold, and menservants, and maidservants, and camels, and asses" (Genesis 24:1 and 35). God had blesses Abraham greatly in all things, and these “all things" are defined, at least partially, as flocks, herds, silver, gold, menservants, maidservants, camels, and asses. Also, "all things" includes within its borders the things received by him which were designated by the Abrahamic Covenant, that (BARAK-EULOGIA)-Sixty Promises- Covenant Structure. Furthermore, everything listed in these two verses accrued to Abraham's benefit as the direct result of the covenant God made him.

How do we know that the flocks, herds, silver, gold, etc., owe their origin and existence to the Abrahamic Covenant?

We know that the flocks, herds, silver, gold, etc., owe their origin and existence to the Abrahamic Covenant because six actual terms and one concept gleaned from a seventh covenant term used in the Sixty Promises are also used here in conjunction with them, identifying the flocks and herds, etc., with the Abrahamic Covenant. To put it another way, these six terms, taken directly from the Abrahamic Covenant and used in conjunction with the flocks, herds, etc., link the covenant and Abraham's wealth together, i.e., Abraham possessed material wealth because God promised in the covenant to bless (BARAK-EULOGIA) him. BARAK-EULOGIA, as we have seen, means "God's enduement of power to produce well-being in every area of life." The wellbeing here is specifically defined as flocks, herds, etc.  The following discussion of the  six covenant terms makes it clear that Abraham owed his flocks, herds, etc., to the Abrahamic Covenant.

The six covenant terms identified below link Abraham's wealth to the covenant: (1) the Lord, (2) he is become great, (3) old...age, (4) blessed, (5) greatly, (6) given. We look briefly now at the six terms which identify Abraham's wealth with the Sixty Promises God made to him and his seed.

1. "The Lord" or "God" are terms used repeatedly in the Sixty Promises. (See Promises 16, 18, 36, 37, 38, and 57.) In addition to the use of these terms in these specific promises, "God" or "Lord" is implied in all Sixty Promises because he is the exclusive God of Scripture who made the Sixty Promises.

2. "He is become great" is a concept derived from Promises 2 and 4, which state that Abraham would become a great nation and would have a great name. Since Genesis 24:1 and 35 describe the conditions of Abraham's later years, we would expect to see his promised greatness recorded here.

3. "Old...age" is also a term used in the Abrahamic Covenant. Promises 22 and 23 state, "Thou shalt go to thy fathers in peace...thou shalt be buried in a good old age" (Genesis 15:15).

4. “Blessed” is a covenant term used in Promises 3, 5, 6, 8, 42, 44, 50, 57, and 60. (See the preceding Visual Analysis of Bless.) This term is used twice in Genesis 24:1 and 35. This is the English translation of BARAK-EULOGIA. In Genesis 24:1 and 35, obviously the blessings are material wealth and owe their origin and existence to the Sixty Promises.

5. "Greatly" is a covenant concept gleaned from Promise 14, "I am thy exceeding great reward," (Genesis 15:1). God was not only Abraham's reward, but in this case, he was also his rewarder. He endued him with beneficial power to produce (or bless him with) flocks and herds, etc., and he did it "greatly."

6. "Given" is used in Promises 9, 10, 12, 18, 25, and 38. In each of these promises, "give" pertains to the giving of the land, which is material wealth. But, "give" in this passage also demonstrates that God is the source of the blessings of the material wealth of flocks, herds, etc. This same word "give," used in the Sixty Promises with reference to the material wealth consisting of land, also refers to the material wealth mentioned here.

Finally, we consider the death of Abraham recorded in Genesis 25:7, 8. "And these are the days of the years of Abraham's life which he lived, a hundred threescore and fifteen years. Then Abraham gave up the ghost and died in a good old age, an old man, and full of years; and was gathered to his people." The expressions, "an old man" and "full of years" are concepts derived from Promise 23 (see 3 above), "Thou shalt be buried in a good old age." Also, the expression "gathered to his people," is a concept derived from Promise 22, "Thou shalt go to thy father's in peace." This concept of a healthy, full, old age, combined with the other six covenant terms or concepts cited above, make a total of seven covenant terms or concepts that link Abraham's health and wealth to the Abrahamic Covenant as the reason for his possessing them.

From the preceding application of the Abrahamic Covenant, the Sixty Promises- (BARAK-EULOGIA)-Covenant Structure, to the life of Abraham, we readily see that the statement, "blessed in all things," (Genesis 24:1), included things contained in this Sixty Promises-(BARAK-EULOGIA)- Covenant Structure that pertained to him personally. Furthermore, "blessed in all things," related to Abraham, certainly includes material prosperity. "Blessed in all things" also includes salvation of the soul, as this is, above all, a benevolent "thing." "Blessed in all things" also includes physical health. The expressions "old man" and "full of years" demonstrates that no terminal disease killed him. The expression "good" relating to his old age, demonstrates that his body was not debilitated by disease. He was not even sickly to the point of discomfort.  He lived out his days. He was full of years. He was comfortable. He died in peace. None of the above; his material wealth, his salvation, or his physical wealth, violates BARAK-EULOGIA: "God's enduement of beneficial power to produce well-being in every area of life." In addition, all the above—wealth, salvation, and health, are included within the borders of the meaning of BARAK-EULOGIA. Furthermore, none of the above violates anything about 0000000the Sixty Promises. All of the above wealth, salvation, and health, are included within the scope of the Sixty Promises. Therefore, the Abrahamic Covenant, the Sixty Promises-(BARAK-EULOGIA)- Covenant Structure, provided, guaranteed, And delivered wealth, salvation, and health for Abraham. The Christian religion must do the same. Otherwise, the Sixty Promises-(BARAK-EULOGIA)- Covenant Structure between God and Abraham is a superior religious system. But, what about his seed? Does the Abrahamic Covenant provide, guarantee, and deliver the "blessings" of wealth, salvation, and health to them also? In the following section, we demonstrate affirmatively this question.

Concordance of Terms Used in the Abrahamic Covenant

Terms                        Promise #

Blessed, Bless, Blessing                        3, 5, 6, 8, 42, 44, 50, 57, 60
Believed                        16

Curse                        5a, 7
Covenant                        26, 27, 29, 35, 48, 49, 55
Circumcision                        40

Deliverance from Bondage (Egypt)                        21

Egypt (implied)                        19, 20, 21

Forever                        9, 35, 38, 48, 49
Fruitful                        32, 51

Giveth                        9, 10, 12, 18, 25, 38
God or Lord                        16, 18, 36, 37, 39, 57
Good Old Age                        23
Great Nation                        2
Great Name                        4
Great Substance                        21

Heir                        15

Increased                        2, 32
Inherit                        18
Ishmael                        50, 51, 52, 53, 54
Isaac                        15, 47, 48, 49, 55

Kings                        34, 46

Land                        1, 9, 10, 12, 18, 24, 25, 26

Multiply                        2, 28, 32, 52, 58

Nations                        30, 33, 45, 54, 60

Peace                        22

Righteousness                        16

Sarah                        41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47
Seed                        10, 11, 15, 17, 19, 21, 24, 25, 35, 37, 38, 39,
                        43, 49, 58, 59, 60
Swore                        56

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